Feedback for Computer Shopper has been compiled from 23 customer reviews

Date Score Customer Comment
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Service rating : Excellent. Always arrives before the copy has hit the bookstands!
Product : Excellent magazine for general PC enthusiasts. Appeals to beginners and more advanced people too.


On 07-Jul-2016 the customer changed their rating and added:
Brilliant magazine. Not too technical but it covers all the essentials.

See this exchange on Feefo
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Service rating : Very pleased with the service have just started with you just had my first month magazine delivered to me
Product : My magazine arrived on time so glad I joined with them now I haven't got to go to town to get it so my her easier having it delivered

Service:++
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Service rating : Always on time, in great condition
Product : A great resource for general info, but a mag I would tend to buy when considering a new build rather than subscription

Service:++
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Service rating : I haven't actually received any service - not that I'm complaining!
Product : Good it may be but it no longer serves my needs

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Service rating : Good to get each issue before the shops
Product : All the information I need is in this

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Service rating : Works fine for me
Product : Give me all the news and update I can ask for

Service:-
Product:-

Service rating : Not the sort of magazine I was told it was
Product : Did like it


On 08-Jun-2016 the supplier responded:
thank you for your feedback.

I'm sorry to hear that the magazine was not as you thought.

I have sent you an email with more information.

Lucy

Service:++
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Service rating : No issues.
Product : I rely on it for good information, tips, advise. Excellent magazine.

Service:--
Product:NA

Service rating : I have yet tovreceive my first issue as a trial even though oayment wasvtaken from my account so totally shoddy
Product : As i have not received the first trial edition i cannot comment but if it is anything like getting a survey forcsomething i have not received then i dont expect a lot


On 03-May-2016 the supplier responded:
Morning Jane,

We appreciate the time that you have taken to leave some feedback, I have sent you an email with further details.

Have a nice day.

Abbie P

Service:+
Product:+

Service rating : Sent the mags when they said they would.
Product : Computer Shopper is a great magazine but I'm afraid not for me,it's a bit too technical, but I gave it a try.

Service:+
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Service rating : Friendly customer service but unable to offer a renewal deal that even came close to previous years' subscription costs
Product : Useful content and reviews that provide a helpful reference for future buying needs and interesting features from time to time. The format is however becoming a bit repetitive and stale.

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Service rating : Efficient delivery every month
Product : Very good and helpful content

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Service rating : I have only received 1 magazine.
Product : 1 magazine too early to comment.


On 08-Apr-2016 the supplier responded:


Thank you for your feedback.

I have been in contact with you by email with a response to your query.

Have a good day!

Abbie P

Service:++
Product:++

Service rating : Magazine delivered on time every month.
Product : A very good magazine that covers a wide range of technology. Easy to read and keeps me up to date with new items.


On 08-Apr-2016 the supplier responded:


Thank you for your review in regards to Computer Shopper.

I am pleased to hear that the magazines have been delivered on time each month and that you think they are easy to read.

Have a lovely weekend!

Abbie P

Service:+
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Service rating : I subscribed...it arrived..
Product : Seems to cover what you would expect.

Service:+
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Service rating : Magazines arrive in the post no problem
Product : Good magazine with the right sort of information in print form, but sometimes is out of date by the time it goes to print and a simple search on the web is cheaper and easier

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Service rating : Excellent
Product : Excellent

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Service rating : Just very good service and friendly call centre staff. Thanks!
Product : It's a great magazine but I would still like to see more Linux articles. Linux is so popular now and I feel coverage in your magazine should be better. It is the main reason I did not carry on with my subscription.

Service:++
Product:NA

Very speedy reply, realise will not get individual reply, but might be anwsered via the magazine.

Service:++
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Service rating : very good
Product : very good

Computer Shopper magazine

The £27 time machine

You don't need a flux capacitor and a DeLorean to revisit your youth. Mark Pritchard gets a Proustian rush with the £27 time machine otherwise known as the Raspberry Pi.

I was on a business studies and computing course at college back in the early 80s. We were learning to program in Basic, and I had a project to finish. One of my mates had a Sinclair ZX81, so I went round to use it. This bad boy came fully loaded with 1K of RAM and a thermal printer. My mate explained that he was going to order a little block of magic - a pack with a huge 16K of RAM, later to be held in place with Blu-Tack.

He offered me a game of "Hunt the Wumpus". I should quickly point out that this was one of the first arcade games available on home computers, rather than anything else you might think. The amazing thing was that the game could run in 1K of memory.

"Does it have colour?" I asked.

"No, it doesn't, but there's a new one coming out which will do. It's…"

"Don't tell me - ZX80, ZX81, therefore ZX82."

"No, it's called a ZX Spectrum, because it has colours."

"OK." That put me in my place.

To smooth the process of paying his 150 employees, Mitch had set up the MASH payroll to send data to Porkshire Bank. MASH has a plug-in for each bank and Mitch had, he said, installed the one for Porkshire. “Doesnae work,” he said. He’d received an error message from Porkshire saying the data file was in the wrong format. He’d talked to the auditors who sold him the system and, being IT experts (sarcasm), they were baffled. He’d talked to his hardware suppliers whose response was “dunno”. He’d talked with MASH tech support, who said the plug-in was fine so it must be his system or Porkshire at fault. Porkshire customer support said the file was in the wrong format. Mitch was piggy in the middle. We were the last resort.

He pulled out a magazine and showed me an advert for the new machine. It was a thing of beauty and looked enormous.

"Wow!" I was hooked. I ordered a ZX Spectrum 16K and waited... and waited... and waited. I waited all summer long. Eventually, three days after I was back at college, it turned up.

It wasn't that much bigger than the ZX81, and I somehow felt slightly cheated because I'm sure the advert showed it to be as big as the average child. However, learning to use it was quite the experience. Obstacles to overcome included how to find the right channel on the TV to get the Sinclair logo to display, and setting the volume on my mono tape recorder correctly to load the first program.

All right, I admit, this first program was a game, but a game I could play on my very own computer. It was a version of Break Out. All those flashing lights in the arcade were finally going to be in my own home. Not a dream but reality... well, with a bit of imagination.

The feeling of being able to get under the bonnet and program was magical. I grabbed every magazine I could get my hands on and entered religiously every piece of code I could find.

Then, as the 80s faded away, I bought an Amiga and its graphical user interface replaced the raw text of Basic and DOS. From this point I moved away from being the mechanic and became more the driver.

Thinking back, the early 80s were great; not just for computing but also for giving us one of the best Dr Whos in Jon Pertwee, and Blake's 7. Both shows gazed into the future, but the glimpse that has always stuck with me was from the latter show.

In Blake's 7 there were two computers. There was Zen, who couldn't do enough for you, and Orac, who wouldn't do a lot for you unless you begged for help. But Orac came in a cool clear case with flashing lights. Both offered a glimpse of the future that, despite my unfailing patience, had so far failed to arrive.

I went to see one of my IT mates the other week, and was discussing the best thing for hooking my TV up to the virtual world of television catch-up and the web.

He looked at me and laughed. "You ought to try a pie." Being partial to pies I was immediately all ears. I'm sure there's a football song that sums up my love of pies.

"Apple?" I asked.

He looked at me oddly. "No, Raspberry."

Then he presented me with a Raspberry Pi, which wasn't what I expected. But, there in its clear case was a small piece of magic that took me back to a time when I was young, mortgage and child-free. There, in front of my eyes, was a miniature Orac, and when I plugged it in, an LED lit up. To say that it felt like Christmas is an understatement.

As you can probably guess, I am now reading up on everything Pi and discovering all the things it can do. As to my IT mate; am I depriving him of his little slice of heaven? No, because he has three more all doing different things and running different operating systems.

I read recently that the creators of the Pi weren't sure how successful it was going to be, and have been amazed at the positive reception the Pi has received. This is hardly surprising. The Pi is a little box of magic that we can get our hands and minds on and make into whatever we want it to be. It's the Lego and Meccano of the IT world and for me it has put the passion back into computing. The Pi has aroused feelings that, as I approach my 50th birthday, I thought I would never again have towards a circuit board.

My wife looks at it as just another computer to add to all the others in the house. Little does she realise that it is, in fact, a time machine, ready and waiting to take us back to those halcyon days of the 80s. Spectrum Basic here I come.

For more, and to stay abreast of everything that's going on in the world of technology, Subscribe to Computer Shopper magazine today, and get your first 3 issues for just £1 »