Feedback for Computer Shopper has been compiled from 23 customer reviews

Date Score Customer Comment
Service:++Product:++Latest:Service++
Product:++

Service rating : Excellent. Always arrives before the copy has hit the bookstands!
Product : Excellent magazine for general PC enthusiasts. Appeals to beginners and more advanced people too.


On 07-Jul-2016 the customer changed their rating and added:
Brilliant magazine. Not too technical but it covers all the essentials.

See this exchange on Feefo
Service:++
Product:++

Service rating : Very pleased with the service have just started with you just had my first month magazine delivered to me
Product : My magazine arrived on time so glad I joined with them now I haven't got to go to town to get it so my her easier having it delivered

Service:++
Product:+

Service rating : Always on time, in great condition
Product : A great resource for general info, but a mag I would tend to buy when considering a new build rather than subscription

Service:++
Product:+

Service rating : I haven't actually received any service - not that I'm complaining!
Product : Good it may be but it no longer serves my needs

Service:++
Product:++

Service rating : Good to get each issue before the shops
Product : All the information I need is in this

Service:++
Product:++

Service rating : Works fine for me
Product : Give me all the news and update I can ask for

Service:-
Product:-

Service rating : Not the sort of magazine I was told it was
Product : Did like it


On 08-Jun-2016 the supplier responded:
thank you for your feedback.

I'm sorry to hear that the magazine was not as you thought.

I have sent you an email with more information.

Lucy

Service:++
Product:++

Service rating : No issues.
Product : I rely on it for good information, tips, advise. Excellent magazine.

Service:--
Product:NA

Service rating : I have yet tovreceive my first issue as a trial even though oayment wasvtaken from my account so totally shoddy
Product : As i have not received the first trial edition i cannot comment but if it is anything like getting a survey forcsomething i have not received then i dont expect a lot


On 03-May-2016 the supplier responded:
Morning Jane,

We appreciate the time that you have taken to leave some feedback, I have sent you an email with further details.

Have a nice day.

Abbie P

Service:+
Product:+

Service rating : Sent the mags when they said they would.
Product : Computer Shopper is a great magazine but I'm afraid not for me,it's a bit too technical, but I gave it a try.

Service:+
Product:+

Service rating : Friendly customer service but unable to offer a renewal deal that even came close to previous years' subscription costs
Product : Useful content and reviews that provide a helpful reference for future buying needs and interesting features from time to time. The format is however becoming a bit repetitive and stale.

Service:++
Product:++

Service rating : Efficient delivery every month
Product : Very good and helpful content

Service:--
Product:+

Service rating : I have only received 1 magazine.
Product : 1 magazine too early to comment.


On 08-Apr-2016 the supplier responded:


Thank you for your feedback.

I have been in contact with you by email with a response to your query.

Have a good day!

Abbie P

Service:++
Product:++

Service rating : Magazine delivered on time every month.
Product : A very good magazine that covers a wide range of technology. Easy to read and keeps me up to date with new items.


On 08-Apr-2016 the supplier responded:


Thank you for your review in regards to Computer Shopper.

I am pleased to hear that the magazines have been delivered on time each month and that you think they are easy to read.

Have a lovely weekend!

Abbie P

Service:+
Product:+

Service rating : I subscribed...it arrived..
Product : Seems to cover what you would expect.

Service:+
Product:+

Service rating : Magazines arrive in the post no problem
Product : Good magazine with the right sort of information in print form, but sometimes is out of date by the time it goes to print and a simple search on the web is cheaper and easier

Service:++
Product:++

Service rating : Excellent
Product : Excellent

Service:++
Product:++

Service rating : Just very good service and friendly call centre staff. Thanks!
Product : It's a great magazine but I would still like to see more Linux articles. Linux is so popular now and I feel coverage in your magazine should be better. It is the main reason I did not carry on with my subscription.

Service:++
Product:NA

Very speedy reply, realise will not get individual reply, but might be anwsered via the magazine.

Service:++
Product:++

Service rating : very good
Product : very good

Computer Shopper magazine

Read the small print

We all love to download and install apps on our smartphones, but few of us pay enough attention to the personal data we let those apps access. Gordon Holmes thinks it's time we started taking app permissions seriously

I like my smartphone. Don't get me wrong, I'm not one of those zombies that walk along the street with eyes glued to the screen reading emails or messages that absolutely have to be read or responded to right now without delay. What is it with these people? For goodness sake leave it alone until you get to your desk or arrive at your destination and stop blocking the pavements. Honestly, it drives me nuts.

Anyway, as I was saying, I like my smartphone. The convenience of accessing the net wherever you are together with some pretty useful apps add up to a positive and practical addition to my daily life. Not that I have gone mad downloading tons of apps; just the essentials like maps, rail travel, news and so on. Oh, and a couple of games for those very long journeys just to break the tedium. So, the other day I was browsing the Google Play store checking out the latest crop of utilities when I saw a game that took my fancy and, seeing that it had loads of good reviews, pressed the install button.

I was then greeted with an eye-watering list of permissions that this game wanted me to agree to. These included the ability to make calls and send texts and emails from my phone without my knowledge, access to my calendar and full contact lists, and to read my phone state and phone identity.

The only thing it didn't ask for was the keys to my house and a full schedule of when it would be empty so it could steal all my belongings and run away laughing.

Needless to say, I didn't download it, but it did make me wonder why this essentially time-wasting game would require all these permissions, and what the motivation was behind such an exhaustive list. It struck me that this was the equivalent of seeing the vampire at the door, recognising it and it only being able to cross the threshold if it was invited in. So I didn't.

The sad fact is that many of us just don't bother to read and consider what it is that we are allowing into our devices; we want the game and just press install, accept the permissions and crack on. I'm not sure that this is the right way to go about things.

Times are definitely changing, with the list of malicious apps and mobile malware growing daily. I am aware of an alert posted as a result of research by the security firm Adaptivemobile - see http://tinyurl.com/kolerworm. This latest threat is a variant of Android ransomware known as Koler, and it has the properties of a worm, using SMS to spread, and also requests permission to read the victim's contact list. The infection starts with an SMS message on the targeted device reading "Someone made a profile named (the contact's name) and he uploaded some of your photos! Is that You?"

This message contains a bit.ly URL which, when clicked, directs to a file-hosting service where the victim is invited to install an app in order to view the photos. Once installed, this malicious app blocks the user's screen with a fake FBI message stating that the device has been blocked for accessing child pornography and Zoophillia (!?!). The victim is then asked for a payment to be made so that the device can be unblocked.

The victim's contact list is read and further SMS messages sent to all listed contacts, so spreading the malware very quickly. It has to be said, however, that this attack can be foiled by not allowing apps to be downloaded from unknown sources; an option that can be found in Settings/Security on Android devices. Just make sure that the corresponding box is not ticked.

At the moment this malware seems to be centred mainly in the USA, hence its use of the FBI warning, but I'm guessing that it won't be long before it's over here. I have already seen one alert by a UK law-enforcement body warning of this attack.

This neatly illustrates how app permissions are becoming more and more relevant if we are to keep our devices safe and avoid our digital identities being stolen or abused. My own response has been to look at all my apps and assess the need for the permissions they require. To be fair there have been a couple of apps that, on reflection, made me wonder just why they need such extensive access. These apps have been binned.

There are others, such as my mobile security program, that require full access, and it is patently obvious why this should be; the apps let you find and monitor a device remotely and even wipe its data in the event of theft or loss, so it's worth keeping your sense of perspective when undertaking this type of review.

As with everything, it pays to use your common sense. If you don't have a problem with those free apps using your data to make a quick buck and report your details to advertising companies, then fine, just keep in mind the potential of the access you decide to grant.

In Bram Stoker's best novel, when Jonathan Harker approached Castle Dracula, he was greeted with "Welcome to my house. Enter freely and of your own free will". You should also be careful with what you accept. You never know where it may lead.

For more, and to stay abreast of everything that's going on in the world of technology, Subscribe to Computer Shopper magazine today, and get your first 3 issues for just £1 »